From Spontaneous Order to Codification

A while ago, I did a blog post on the “Hayek Memorial Pathway,” one of a series of pathways that have developed on campus though people’s actions. Well, they’re doing a bunch of construction on campus and part of it includes paving the Hayek Memorial Pathway.

Some years from now, people will forget that the pathway was one unpaved and unplanned, that it was only by the constant movement of thousands of students that the path at all formed in the first place. All the “government” (i.e., George Mason University) did was codify what people already did.

Socialists and central planners often point out various institutions and state proudly “look at the good government is doing!” What they fail to see, however, is the spontaneous orders that predated those codifications. For example, they fail to see the development of the law that legislation merely codified. Or the development of money that legislation merely codified. These institutions were not part of government planning, but rather of government codification of already-in-action plans.

Likewise, this is why I disagree with “one-drop” libertarians (ie, those who oppose anything and everything government does, insisting it must inherently be inefficient). Not every institution the government codifies is inherently inefficient. When they merely codify what people are already doing, then that may not change the efficiency at all (indeed, given certain conditions, it may improve efficiency). GMU paving the Hayek Memorial Pathway does not in and of itself imply the pathway is in any way less a spontaneous order or less efficient.