Today's Quote of the Day...

is from page 66 of the Liberty Fund’s 1999 edition of James Buchanan’s Cost and Choice:

In order to estimate the size of the corrective tax [to correct an externality], however, some objective measurement must be placed on these external costs. But the analyst has no benchmark from which plausible estimates can be made. Since the persons who bear these “costs” - whose who are externally affected - do not participate in the choice that generates the “costs,” there is simply no means of determining, even indirectly, the value that they place on the utility loss that might be avoided. In the classic example, how much would the housewife whose laundry is fouled give to have the smoke removed from the air? Until and unless she is actually confronted with this choice, any estimate must remain almost wholly arbitrary.

JMM: The fact that the cost to the external party is almost wholly arbitrary unless they are actually confronted with the choice does not imply that the estimation of the cost is irrelevant. What it does imply, however, is that welfare economics is not as precise and accurate as the blackboard models would have you believe. We should be wary of any scheme that relies on some “optimal” tax, tariff, or price in order to operate. The result of that model is wholly dependent on the analyst’s assumptions about what people would do if actually faced with a given choice.